Inmate Search

Texas Inmate Search

Texas Inmate Search

Individuals searching for information on inmates in Texas have a number of different resources which they might use. There are searches for inmates on the county level, and there are searches for inmates on the state level. On the state level, one might go to the Texas inmate search service available on the Texas Department of Criminal Justice website. 
This Texas inmate locator service allows searchers to find information on inmates online, through email, or through a telephone call, depending upon personal preference and availability. The information obtained through the Texas inmate search service is relatively general when searched by any given user. Such information includes the inmate’s Texas Department of Criminal Justice identification number, the inmate’s current location in incarceration, the inmate’s offense which led to his or her incarceration, his or her release date based on the conviction and on current projections, and any information regarding the inmate’s prior incarceration and conviction history. This Texas inmate locator service is free to all users. No photographs will be given as part of this Texas inmate search service.
For those who are looking for information on inmates within a particular county, however, then examining the county inmate search service may be a better plan than using the overall Texas inmate locator service. Such individual county services include the Harris County inmate search and the search service for Cameron County inmates. The Harris County inmate search service is available on the Harris County sheriff’s department website, where an individual can provide an inmate’s name, birth date, SPN identification number of Social Security Number in order to find information regarding a particular inmate. 
The Harris County inmate search is entirely available online. In the case of Cameron County, a listing is available online of all current Cameron County inmates. This list provides information including the charge of arrest for those Cameron County inmates, the current price of bail, and the date of booking. Photographs and more information on each of the Cameron County inmates are also available. 

Yellowstone County Detention Facility

Yellowstone County Detention Facility

The Yellowstone County Detention Facility is a relatively small detention center located in Yellowstone Montana. It was built to house fewer than 200 inmates, however, an significant increase in the inmate population initiated expansion efforts, which were undertaken in 1995. 
 
 
The Yellowstone County Detention Facility is primarily dedicated to containing and supervising adult offenders. Both violent and non-violent criminals are housed within this facility. Juvenile offenders are generally placed in the care of alternative juvenile detention centers throughout the state of Montana. One such juvenile hall is the Cascade County Regional Youth Services Center, located in Great Fall, Montana. This facility plays an important role in the rehabilitation of juvenile offenders, as do other juvenile halls throughout the state.
 
 
The Cascade County Regional Youth Services Center offers juvenile offenders with a safe environment to serve sentences. This facility is reserved for individuals who are between the ages of 10 and 18, and who have been charged with a crime. This detention facility offers offenders with access to beneficial services and important resources. Within this detention facility, juveniles will receive a proper education. 
 
 
Schooling is year round and classes are taught be certified teachers. In addition to an education, juvenile offenders placed in this facility also have access to recreational services and therapeutic services. The Cascade County Regional Youth Services Center maintains 24 beds, and provides long term care to juvenile offenders. 

Unlawful Actions: Lawyer Attempts to Kill Colleague

Unlawful Actions: Lawyer Attempts to Kill Colleague

South Carolina attorneys, Irby Walker and Doug Thornton, had been working alongside one another for decades. Although the two grew close enough to share office space, the relationship dissipated sometime after 2006. Dislike soon morphed into hate and then, regrettably, into vengeance. 
Horry County Police recently caught wind of a plot in which Walker was attempting to hire a hit man to kill Thornton, his longtime colleague. In response to the plot, local police dispatched an undercover officer posing as a hit man to begin negotiations with Walker.
During the conversation, Walker affirmed his plot and agreed to pay the undercover officer (posing as a hit man) with a substantial check. With the first-person evidence in hand, police arrested Walker on the spot and charged the scornful lawyer with solicitation to commit a felony. 
When arrested, Walker referred to the charges as farcical, stating, “I’ve been a hardworking attorney for a long time. I believe I’m an ethical person.” These comments; however, proved meaningless, as Walker later pleaded guilty to the charge. 
For his felonious intentions, Walker received a 10-year prison sentence, with a seven year suspension—meaning he will only serve three years for his attempted murder plot. In addition to the jail time, Walker’s law license was, not surprisingly, revoked. 

Convicted Terrorist Guilty of Murder-to-Hire

Convicted Terrorist Guilty of Murder-to-Hire


On November 8, 2012, the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina reported that Hysen Sherifi of Raleigh was found guilty of nine counts in a murder-for-hire conspiracy.  Sherifi is believed to have conspired with two other people in order to retaliate against witnesses who provided evidence in Sherifi’s terrorism case.  


Hysen Sherifi was indicted with his brother, Shkumbin Sherifi, and Nevine Elshiekh on February 21, 2012.  Hysen Sherifi was previously sentenced to 45 years in prison on terrorism charges.  During the second trial, evidence proved that Sherifi offered to pay a hitman between November 2011 and January 22, 2012 to murder three witnesses and behead them.  Sherifi now faces life in prison for the charges.


Court documents show that Sherifi asked another inmate at the New Hanover County, North Carolina Detention Facility if he knew how to hire someone to commit a series of murder.  The inmate then relayed the information to his attorney, and federal agents started an investigation in November of 2011.  


$5,000 was given to an outside informant who the three defendants believed was paying the hitman.  Staged photos were set up by federal agents, and Shkumbin sent photos of a dead body and a severed head to Hysen on the day they were arrested.  Other evidence included recorded jail calls, recordings in and outside the prison, and testimony.  


Sherifi is scheduled for sentencing on February 4, 2013.  


U.S. Attorney Thomas G. Walker stated, “This conviction is further evidence of our resolve to pursue those who seek to attack our freedoms and destroy the way of life we all cherish.  We will not waiver in our commitment to bring these individuals to justice.”


The investigation was led by Raleigh and Wilmington FBI Agencies and the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office.  


Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation

County Jail Inmates

County Jail Inmates

Many counties in states throughout the country maintain their own jails. A county jail is operated by the sheriff’s department within that county. In addition to county jails, states will maintain a state prison. State prisons are generally larger and more extensive than county jails. 
In most instances, state prisons are reserved for convicts who are sentenced to spend many years in prison. On the other hand, county jails are reserved for individuals who have been given a short sentence, or who have not yet undergone their trial. County jails inmates have been accused of committing crimes, however, they have not necessarily been convicted of those crimes. 
If an individual has been accused of committing an offense, he/she may become a county jail inmate, and remain contained within the county jail until he/she is convicted of a crime, or pardoned. In the event that he/she is convicted and sentenced, he/she may be transported to a state or federal prison, depending upon the sentence he/she received.
In addition to people awaiting trial, county jail inmates may also be convicts who committed relatively minor offenses, and thereby received a short prison sentence. In most instances, inmates contained within a county jail have acquired a prison sentence of one year, or less. 
Due to the existence of judicial discretion, the crimes that were committed to land convicts in county jails may very substantially. While one inmate may have been convicted of carrying a concealed weapon, another may have been charged with a drug offense. Nevertheless, county jail inmates are usually not considered to be dangerous, high risk prisoners.