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Cowlitz County Jail

Cowlitz County Jail

Cowlitz County Jail is located at 1935 1st Avenue in Longview, Washington. The Cowlitz County jail is a relatively small facility that houses many non-violent criminals who have repeatedly failed to exhibit moral behavior in society. The majority of inmates within the confines of the Cowlitz rehabilitation facility were found guilty of drug use or drug possession. 
As a result, the Cowlitz County jail works closely with the city’s drug courts and numerous drug programs which are created to educate individuals towards the dangers and legal consequences of drug use. The Cowlitz County jail houses roughly 150 inmates at a time, although this number fluctuates as a result of the constant traffic between the facility and others within the area. A full roster of inmates can be found online, at the Cowlitz County jail website. The roster includes all the active inmates, their respective locations within the facility, the date of their incarceration, and a list of all their charges.
The Cowlitz County jail contains 8 specific cell blocks. Labeled A through H, the cell blocks each contain roughly 20 inmates. As a result of the minimal security level, the majority of inmates are allowed to interact with each other, and most of them have cellmates. With the increased interaction however, comes increased security. 
The inmates are under constant patrol and monitoring from remote locations as well as patrolling security officers. The goal of Cowlitz county jail is not to simply confine wrongdoers, but to rehabilitate them, so their re-entry into society is streamlined.

Field of Penology

Field of Penology

Penology

Penology is a field of criminology. One of the primary concerns of penology is prison reform. Prison reform addresses many concerns, such as the proper practice of re-socialization, reducing recidivism, protecting prisoners’ rights, how to balance deterrence, retribution, and rehabilitation, and helping felons find jobs after their release.
Resocialization

Re-socialization refers to the process by which individuals are helped to adapt to life in a new environment. Re-socialization for to jail involves teaching individuals how to abide by the rules of the jail.

Jobs for convicted felons

Finding jobs for convicted felons is a challenge. Some jobs for felons cannot be held due to a previous arrest. Jobs for ex-offenders may be permitted if the individual is cleared by a licensing board to hold a job the convicted felon would otherwise be unable to hold.
Recidivism

Recidivism is the chance of a repeat offender committing another offense. Recidivism typically refers to when a repeat offender commits an offense that is similar to the act they were previously convicted of, although recidivism may also occur if a shoplifter commits murder.

Prisoners rights
Prisoners’ rights refers to the rights that are retained by prisoners even after they have been convicted of a crime. Much of the prisoners’ rights movement is concerned with helping prisoners make sure that their rights are not violated.

Deterrence
Deterrence is the aspect of penology that aims to prevent an individual from deciding to pursue a course of action that will result in them becoming a felon in the first place. Deterrence can be specific or general.
Retribution

Retribution is the attempt to make sure that a convict receives a punishment that is appropriate to the crime the convict has committed. Modern practices of retribution means ensures that a convict will not receive a punishment that is identical to their crime, but is simply proportionate.

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation of felons is the goal of much of the American penal system. Rehabilitation of felons has become the guiding principle in penology over the last century.

Anoka County Jail

Anoka County Jail

County jails are an important resource when it comes to county and state safety issues; the purpose of a county jail is to hold the criminals after they have been apprehended for numerous crimes. 
Because county jails tend to be on the smaller side, these are facilities often used for the holding of individuals until a hearing or as inmates of the facility serving a year or less duration of a sentence. These facilities, like the Anoka county jail, are facilities ran by a smaller group of correctional officers and can be both minimum and maximum security facilities
The Anoka county jail of Minnesota is an example of the average type of county jail facility. It is a place of detainment for criminals who are serving a shorter duration of time. In instances where and individual is sentenced to several years in prison, they might be held at the Anoka county jail until the ability to transfer to another facility comes along.
A county jail like the Anoka county jail has to be run under the strict adherence to the guidelines set forth by the American Correctional Association. These guidelines were set forth to provide and maintain a standard of rights and regulations that have to be looked after. 
Within these guidelines, the Anoka county jail must provide certain amenities for the inmates. This includes 3 meals a day, showering facilities, laundry service, and the ability to contact family while in the jail.
There are certain restrictions on the items that can be given to an inmate in the Anoka county jail. These restrictions can be limitations on the type of photographs; inmates are allowed to have photographs, as long as they do not display gang affiliation or nudity. 
If a family member wants to give the individual a book or other publication to read, it has to be purchased through a distributor and mailed directly to the jail; this is to ensure that no weapons, drugs, or various other contraband were slipped in. Overall, the Anoka county jail is the average, accommodating, law enforcement facility. 

132 Domain Names Seized During Project Cyber Monday

132 Domain Names Seized During Project Cyber Monday


On November 26, 2012, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that 132 domain names selling counterfeit merchandise were seized during this year’s “Project Cyber Monday 3” and “Project Transatlantic” operations.  The operations were led by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), the European Police Office (Europol), and law enforcement in Belgium, Denmark, France, Romania, and the United Kingdom.  


101 website domains were seized by operation Cyber Monday 3.  Project Transatlantic seized 31 domain names including domains like .eu, .be, .dk, .fr, .ro, and .uk.  The websites were specifically targeted by the IPR Center.  


ICE Director John Morton stated: “This operation is a great example of the tremendous cooperation between ICE and our international partners at the IPR Center.  Our partnerships enable us to go after criminals who are duping unsuspecting shoppers all over the world.  This is not an American problem, it is a global one and it is a fight we must win.”  


The seized domain names are currently in the government’s custody.  If visitors enter the domain names in their browser, they will see a banner that notifies them of the seizure and explains the federal crime of willful copyright infringement.  In addition to the domain names, $175,000 paid through PayPal accounts is being targeted by the government as well.  


1,529 domain names have previously been seized by the United States since 2010.  684 of the seized domain names are now property of the U.S. government.  The seizure banner has been viewed over 110 million times.  


Tod Cohen, the vice president and deputy general counsel of Government Relations for eBay Inc., stated: “PayPal and eBay Inc. pride ourselves in going above and beyond in the fight against the illegal online trafficking of counterfeit goods by partnering with law enforcement and rights owners globally, and we hope that this is fair warning to criminals that the Internet is not a safe place to try and sell fake goods.”  


U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Maryland, Colorado, New Jersey, California, New York, and Texas helped serve warrants.  Assistance was provided by the Justice Department’s Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section.  


Source: Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Finally Caught: Illegal Alien Wanted for Rape

Finally Caught: Illegal Alien Wanted for Rape


On October 11, 2012, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) announced that it successfully tracked and apprehended the illegal alien after finding him in southwest Detroit.  


The man’s name is Miguel Angel Davila- Ruiz.  He was wanted by the ICE on four counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor.  The crime was reported in Pontiac, Michigan, and ERO and the Sheriff’s Office issued an arrest warrant in July of 2012.  They offered a $2,000 reward for information about Davila-Ruiz, and the media immediately became involved.  


After receiving information from numerous sources, officers under the ERO Fugitive Operations located Davila-Ruiz on October 10.  He was hiding in a residence on the 1200 block of Central Street located in southwest Detroit.  


As the officers were making an entry into the house, Davila-Ruiz and another man exited from the rear of the house on foot.  The chase didn’t last long.  The two men were apprehended in the backyard of the home.  


Davila-Ruiz was moved to the Sheriff’s Office on the night of October 10.  After the investigation is completed, he will face sentencing.  He will then return to ICE custody where he will begin to be processed for deportation.


The other male was also arrested on administrative immigration violations.  He will remain in ICE custody until he is deported.  


Rebecca Adducci, the field office director for ERO Detroit, stated: “The arrest of this alleged violent alien is at the absolute core of what we do.  ICE is using its unique immigration enforcement authorities to safeguard our communities from criminal aliens and others who pose a public safety threat, including suspects attempting to evade law enforcement.  I’m very fortunate to lead a team of officers who day in and day out exhibit unmatched skill and professionalism in the pursuit of criminal aliens.”


Source: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
 

Arizona Law



The
area of state Arizona law has enjoyed, or been burdened with, newly
intense scrutiny and comment since the legislation commonly referred to
as SB (State Bill) 1070 was first proposed as an overhaul for the
state’s immigration laws. The new Arizona law, formally referred to as
the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act, was
generally seen, both by opponents and proponents, as one of the
“toughest” laws to be passed against illegal immigration to the U.S. for
a long time. Most worrying to critics of the new Arizona law is the
place it reserves for ethnicity and race in empowering police officers
to act against people they suspect of being in the state illegally.
While supporters of the Arizona law point to this allegation as a
mischaracterization, citing the law’s requirement that this not be the
only criteria for enforcement, Arizona law opponents believe it will
lead to an increased degree of discrimination against the state’s Latino
residents, both legally resident and otherwise.


Outside
of the specter of potential human rights abuses, the Arizona law has
also received criticism, and in some cases legal challenges and
opposition, due to the claim that it has usurped the rightful place of
the federal government in enforcing illegal immigration laws. As such,
Arizona law opponents have argued that the federal government has
largely shirked its responsibilities for this matter, and that the
state’s intervention has been made available by the epidemic of violence
on the other side of the border.

Federal Prisons for Federal Inmates

Federal Prisons for Federal Inmates

A federal inmate is an individual who is sentenced to spend time in a federal prison. In order for an individual to become a federal inmate, he/she must commit a federal crime, and subsequently be tried and convicted by a federal court. If he/she is tried by a state court, he/she will be required to carry out his/her sentence in a state prison, thereby making him/her a state prison inmate.
The severity of the crime that an individual commits does not determine whether he/she will serve his/her sentence in a state prison or a federal prison. There are many different types of crimes that may be tried in a federal court. For example, fraud, forgery, embezzlement, counterfeiting, extortion, cyber crimes, and insider trading are all considered to be federal crimes. Violent crimes, including murder and arson can be tried by a federal court, though they are usually addressed by state courts. 
As a result of the variety of crimes that can be tried by federal courts, federal prison inmates may range a great deal in demeanor and personality. The federal prison system maintains numerous prisons, all of which are considered to have different levels of security. 
The most dangerous federal prison inmates are generally contained within maximum security federal prisons. For example, individuals convicted of serial murder or crimes against children may be kept in a maximum security federal facility. Convicts who have not committed violent crimes may remain in minimum security federal prisons.

Plan to Kill Obama Foiled

Plan to Kill Obama Foiled

A 21-year-old Uzbek man was indicted Tuesday (July 26th) and charged with threatening to kill President Barack Obama. Authorities state that Ulugbek Kodirov—who was illegally in the United States when his student visa was revoked—had obtained an M15 machine gun and one hand grenade to carry-out his plot of murdering the President.
Kodirov, along with counts of weapons and immigration violations , was charged with four counts of threatening the President of the United States. The young Uzbek man was arrested on July 13 in Leeds, Alabama after he purchased the machine gun from an undercover agent. 
The suspect entered the United States during the summer of 2009; Kodirov remained in the country after his student visa was revoked for not staying in school. 
For his assassination plot, Kodirov faces a maximum sentence of twenty years in prison (five years for each count) and a maximum of 10 years for the weapons charges. 
The plot was effectively foiled due to intelligence gathering and the seamless coordination between federal and local law enforcement agencies. 

A Sex Dungeon Education

A Sex Dungeon Education

The for-profit education system in America has somewhat of a controversial reputation. David Lee, the chancellor of the University of Northern Virginia, has not helped quell this sentiment.
Last week, Lee’s alleged university was raided by federal immigration agents on information that the chancellor was using his institution as a means to illegally funnel Indian men and women into the country without visas. The school was used as a guise; Lee would take-in the individuals under a falsified student visa and they would stay in America (without studying) after paying the chancellor an undisclosed sum.   
While the agents were investigating Lee’s mansion, a war-chest of indecent and perverse materials were found.  In addition to numerous pornographic materials retrieved from his computer, Lee who has made a fortune off scamming the student visa “business”, was found to be running a sex dungeon in his $800,000 home’s basement.
The 64-year-old Lee and his girlfriend were found to have visited the exhibitionist website, collarme.com, where they posted adds imploring women to come to their homes to partake in obscene and perverse sex games. 
When they found women to play their “sex slave” role, the couple foolishly posted pictures online. After being caught, Lee and his girlfriend brushed-off their perversions by claiming they provide “a safe and sane home with a good balance of love and discipline.” The oddballs went onto say, “we are very serious about finding a permanent addition to our poly family.”
The investigation is still pending, but it can be assumed that Lee will, at the very least, be relieved of his role as Chancellor of the University of Northern Virginia. 

The Prison Fellowship Organization

The Prison Fellowship Organization

The Prison Fellowship is an organization that exists for the purpose of reforming incarcerated prisoners, ex-convicts, and their families through the help of the Christian faith. It is considered to be a criminal justice reform organization, and it exists in the United States and in other countries across the world through Prison Fellowship International. It was founded by Chuck Colson in 1976, who was also incarcerated at one point during his life. Colson formed Prison Fellowship once he became a born again Christian.
The mission of the Prison Fellowship is rooted in using faith-based programs to target the causes of crimes committed by those incarcerated or recently released. Through the promotion of the Christian faith by mentoring, education, and biblical training, the organization seeks to turn these criminals to the Christian faith to hopefully resolve their problems that may have lead them to a life of crime. Programs such as Starting Line, InnerChange Freedom Initiative, and Angel Tree are all developed to reach prisoners and ex-convicts with the hope of possibly turning their lives around with the positive message of the Christian Faith.  
Prison Fellowship also has a branch organization known as Justice Fellowship, which intends to work with policymakers at both the state and federal levels to change some of the principles of legal system and revert them to justice concepts that are found in the bible.